A new commandment

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The Lord said, “I give you a new commandment: love one another as I have loved you, so you also should love one another” (Jn. 13:34). If there is a new commandment, there must be an old one, and the reason why the Lord gave a new commandment was because the old commandment was based on revenge. “You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ But I say to you offer no resistance to one who is evil” (Mt. 5:38). The Pharisees and scribes in Jesus’ time displayed arrogance, pretension and pride, not love.

Jesus knows that our loving is measured the way we want, which at times is stained with selfishness and pride. It is easy to love someone who has given you favors, whose pocket has good quality and quantity, someone who doesn’t oppose or contradict you, and whose last words are, “Yes, Sir or yes, Mam.” How about loving the poor and the ignorant who can’t give us anything except to beg and depend on others?

It is said that the best place to start love for one another is in our homes and relationships. For love to grow, there must be respect, trust and appreciation, otherwise, you just float along and follow the motion. That kind of love is sure to fail and die out.

Remember the “Love Story” movie that swept the world’s box offices in 1970 starring Ali MacGraw and Ryan O’Neal? There is a striking line that deeply hit people’s hearts and souls which said, “Love means never having to say you are sorry.” When you realize that you have done something wrong, betrayed a person, offended someone’s feelings, or cheated your spouse, you say sorry. When you break a promise, fail to show up at the meeting, disappoint a loved one, said hurting words, burst into anger, mistakenly blamed one for your own mess, forgot to greet a dear one on their birthday or perhaps you forgot your wedding anniversary unless you are too old to remember, and other misgivings you did down the road of life, you say you are sorry. But you have nothing to say you are sorry for when you are honest with, show respect to, trust and truly care for the one you love.

On the flip side, someone said that the people you’ll not forget in your life are the ones who loved you when you didn’t deserve it or when you were not very lovable. And in marriage, they say that it takes love, patience, understanding, respect, trust, friendship and faith in your relationship to make it alive and lasting.

It is said that the best place to start love for one another is in our homes and relationships. For love to grow, there must be respect, trust and appreciation, otherwise, you just float along and follow the motion. That kind of love is sure to fail and die out.

I heard some affirmation that no matter how old you both get, never stop holding hands, never stop dancing, and never stop saying, “I love you.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, “I have decided to stick to love… Hate is too great a burden to bear.”

I recall a friend’s admonition reminding that the scars on your body show that you have lived and scars on your heart show that you have loved.

Here’s a line to live by, “Don’t be impressed by money, followers, degrees and titles. Be impressed by generosity, integrity, humility and kindness.” Amen on that folks!

In her Diary No. 294, St. Faustina wrote Jesus words, “Oh, how I love those who have complete confidence in Me, I will do everything for them.”

Pray the Divine Mercy prayer every 3 p.m. Recite the Chaplet of Mercy for peace daily.

Divine Mercy Pilgrimage
Please join me in pilgrimage to the Holy Land, Divine Mercy Shrine in Poland, Black Madonna church in Poland, Warsaw, Vienna, Venice, Pisa, Rome and many more sites from July 9-26, 2016. For more info., please call Lou Salas, 477-8079; Ann Marie, 649-3221 or Fr. Joel-483- 9464. Thank you.