Detour

289

By Father Joel de los Reyes
Divine Mercy Moments

St. Luke’s Gospel in 9:51-55 tells about Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem, and how he sent messengers ahead of him. On the way, they entered a Samaritan village to prepare his reception there but they would not welcome him because his destination was Jerusalem. When James and John saw this they asked, “Lord do you want us to call down fire from heaven to consume them? Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they journeyed to another village.”

Compare the demeanor of Jesus with his disciples. We see here the human reaction shown by James and John for being refused entry by the Samaritans into their village. They wanted to use force and burn their village to avenge their shame and humiliation for not getting their way. They were vindictive and their feeling of superiority enraged them to look down on the lower class with arrogance and pride.

Isn’t this behavior common among many of us too? If you don’t get what you want, you show a belligerent attitude. When your idea or suggestion is not entertained you get angry or disappointed? When you are voted out of your circle due to your mean attitude, you resort to name-calling and blame everybody for your own mess.

Jesus teaches us to be humble and strive for peace and not strike with violence if we don’t get our way. His making of a detour gives us an example to avoid trouble, escape evil, refrain from seeking revenge, but find good ways to resolve problems and concerns.

In contrast to the disciples’ war-freak behavior, Jesus calmly made a detour to another village without fanfare or complaint. He didn’t judge the Samaritans for their action nor got angry with them, but he respected their decision for not letting him pass through their village.

Jesus teaches us to be humble and strive for peace and not strike with violence if we don’t get our way. His making of a detour gives us an example to avoid trouble, escape evil, refrain from seeking revenge, but find good ways to resolve problems and concerns.

Let us bear in mind that hatred begets hatred, and love begets love. We should accept the fact that we can never please everyone. We should acknowledge our weaknesses and limitations, make a detour to find other ways to reach our goal, for “if there is a will, there is a way”, says the old dictum. For the Lord, there is always one more chance, one more seat, one more opening and one more opportunity to start anew.

Here are some lines of the Litany of Humility which should challenge our selfish motives and put ourselves in a proper spiritual and moral perspective: “Deliver me Lord from the desire of being honored, from the desire of being extolled, from the fear of being despised, from the fear of being wronged. Jesus grant me the grace to desire that others may be esteemed more than I, that others may be praised and I unnoticed.”

On the flip side, someone said that some people grumble that roses have thorns, but let’s be thankful that thorns have roses. When you fail, bear in mind that the Lord has already arranged a comeback for every setback. He creates new beginning for every disappointment. He will make a way when there seems to be no way. We can be happy with little and be miserable with much.

Don’t give up, for God will give you the strength you need to hold on. Remember that the ones who love you will never leave you. Even if there are a hundred reasons to give up, they will find one reason to hold on. As they say that difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations. Amen on that folks!

In her Diary no. 215, St. Faustina wrote Jesus’ words, “My daughter, be at peace; I am taking all these matters to Myself.”

Pray the Divine Mercy every 3 p.m. Daily recite the Chaplet of Mercy for peace.